Practice letting go

A  hockey game?  A playoff?  In Pittsburgh?  Are you insane?  What if Thing 1 has to sit near someone with horrible cologne that sends him into an asthma attack?  What if he gets hit with a puck?  What if a fight broke out, somebody snatched him, or the stadium collapsed?  What if he experienced a food allergy that we never knew he had, or heard bad words, or got bored?

hockey

Photo by ShawnStPeter. Click to purchase the image on Etsy.

We don’t get out much, and I have to practice.

What if he doesn’t see anything to eat when he sees the stadium food?  He has sensory processing issues, what if it’s too noisy, too crowded, too overwhelming?  What if it’s a mistake?

Running Mate tries to talk me down.  No recent asthma.  Statistics on getting hit with a puck, a fight breaking out, being snatched.  I know I have to listen to logic and I do.  I don’t believe it will be okay, but I listen.  We gave him an allergy pill and a snack before he left.  Rehearsed “help help this is not my parent” and were sure the friend’s parents had my cel number in their phone.  I will happily come get you.  He nods. Running mate drops him off on his way to work, leaving me home with Thing 2.

affghan

Three-color spiral table cover, afghan, or time out spot. Click to see it in my etsy shop. Funnermother.com

Thing 2 asks to have a night of no tv.  I need a distraction!  We soak our feet, paint our nails, camp out in the living room.  The whole time, I am crocheting myself into a frenzy–a red yellow and white spiral that could be a table cover or a couch blanket.  I wait for my inevitable phone call to go get Thing 1.  I nod off.  My phone tinkles; I jump. A picture of Thing 1 cheering…  from the third row!  He’s alive, he’s healthy, and he’s happy.  I nod off again and when the phone rings, it’s to say he is in the driveway.

I did it!  I mean, he did it.  If you want to give your kids more independence, teach them safety and coping, join me on Facebook and stay tuned right here!

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8 thoughts on “Practice letting go

    • Gabrielle, thanks for your comment. I was preoccupied that night, to be sure. I could hear the logic in what Running Mate was saying, luckily. Not sure that always happens! haha. But no tragedy happened. And that, in the end, is the lesson. Thanks again, xx a

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  1. You did it Angela! Yay! That’s so cute. I love how honest and vulnerable you are. It lets us readers know that it’s ok to be scared, to have doubts, to ask for help and still let go. And that is an amazing gift to receive.

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    • Elaine, I always love your feedback. It’s a fine line whether or not I will be able to let go. Every new challenge is … a scary new challenge! Ha ha. But yes, I need to be resilient if I want my kids to be, I suppose. Thanks for your comment. xx a

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  2. Congratulations!! A huge milestone for both of you for sure. I could feel my heart beating faster just reading your blog, as if that were me and my child. Our oldest is about that age and independence is the best way to build awareness and confidence, when done well. Sounds like you nailed it!

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    • Aly, Thanks for your comment. Yes! I want him to be careful but not frightened. It is a fine line to be sure. But my little one-pound wonder is a thing of the past, and while he doesn’t remember that part, I do, and it’s hard to let go sometimes. Thanks so much for your congrats. xx a

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